Tag Archives: ontology

Ontology Review 2: The International System of Units (SI). US Resistance to Adoption of the Metric System

The International System of Units (SI) [72 page pdf Brochure] is maintained by the Bureau International des Poids et Measures at it’s headquarters in Sevres near Paris, France. The Metric System as it is often known has a long history; supposedly invented in 1670 by Gabriel Mouton, a French clergyman, It was adopted by France in 1795 and by the United States in 1866. The system gained international status with the signing of The Convention of the Meter in Paris on 20th May 1875. The U.S. was one of the original seventeen signatory nations and is the only industrialized nation that still does not use the system.

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Ontology Review 1. The NHS Common Basic Specification. Why top level Ontologies don’t work.

This is the first of an occasional series of reviews I intend to write to illustrate some important general traits of ontologies. In each review I will dissect an ontology and examine why it succeeded or failed. In this essay I mention concepts that are defined in my previous essay. Judging the likely success of an ontology. This first review covers an ontology called the Common Basic Specification (CBS) that was designed in the late 1980s to bring much needed standardization and rationalization to the fragmented information management processes of the British National Health Service (NHS). It persisted in various forms until the late 1990′s when it was finally abandoned. This is my explanation of why it failed.

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Judging the likely Success of an Ontology

The debate about the promised value of the Semantic Web seems to me to be missing a dispassionate examination of the success, or otherwise, of existing ontology based solutions. Clay Shirky is obviously right when he states that a single monolithic ontology will never work. His critics are equally right when they claim the Semantic web will only work if it is a melange of multiple interoperable Ontologies. What is missing from the debate is a more detailed explanation of what ontologies are good at, how they interoperate, and why systems based on ontologies succeed or fail. From my perspective as a systems designer this last point is the most significant. Debates about theory are nice, but examples of real solutions are more instructive. This essay will begin to examine this question by attempting to define the anatomy of an ontology. I will use this structure in later essays to examine the reasons for success and failure of individual ontologies.

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A Process for Prioritizing and Managing Problem Resolution in a Complex Environment

Just because you can make a decision or solve a problem does not mean you should. There are times when it’s better to delay until the last possible moment, others when its best to go half way and stop, and of course times when action must be taken immediately. Recognizing the best way to handle any given situation is fundamental when handling large numbers of problems. Recently I’ve been working with a client on defining a change management process for a large system and have been thinking about these issues.

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